Insect identification

Box 8

Insects whose leathery front wings have a membranous tip. Go to Hemiptera, the true bugs.

Insects whose front wings are the same leathery texture along the whole length. Go to Box 9.

Box 9

Insects whose front wings are hard, without veins, and meet down the centre in a straight line at least part of the way. Go to Box 10.

Insects whose front wings have veins, overlap to some extent, and are held like a roof over the body. Go to Box 11.

Box 10

Insects whose abdomen ends in a pair of pincer-like, horny appendages. Go to Dermaptera, the earwigs.

Insects not like this. Go to Coleoptera, the beetles.

Box 11

Insects that have a piercing, sucking, beak-like mouth (this may be folded under its body like a pen-knife when it is not feeding). Go to Hemiptera, the true bugs.

Insects not like this. Go to Box 12.

Box 12

Insects with hinds legs that are large, strong and good for jumping. Go to Orthoptera, crickets and grasshoppers, etc.

Insects with hind legs that are not modified for jumping. Go to Dictyoptera, cockroaches and mantids.

Box 13

Tiny insects covered in a white powdery substance. Go to Box 14.

Insects not covered in a white powdery substance. Go to Box 15.

Box 14

Insects that hold their wings flat over their body and have piercing, sucking mouthparts. The piercing mouthparts (see the drawing below) may be folded under the body when not feeding. Go to Hemiptera, the true bugs.

Hemiptera stylets

Insects that hold their wings roof-like over their body when at rest. The mouthparts are the biting type (this may be difficult to see, but it is enough to be sure they do not have a stylets - see right). Go to Neuroptera, lace wings, ant lions, alderflies, snake flies etc.

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